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Scorpionfly
insect
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Scorpionfly

insect
Alternative Titles: Mecoptera, Panorpa meridionalis, mecopteran

Scorpionfly, (order Mecoptera), any of several species of insects characterized by chewing mouthparts at the tip of an elongated beak; long, many-segmented, threadlike antennae; and two pairs of membranous, net-veined wings that may be transparent, darkly spotted, or banded. The larva resembles a caterpillar; pupation occurs in the soil. Both larva and adult feed on dead animals, especially insects, and sometimes on plants.

The scorpionfly is harmless to humans and serves a useful function in nature as a scavenger. Its name refers to the way in which the male holds its genitalia (a bulblike segment at the end of the abdomen) over its back in a manner similar to that of a scorpion.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.
Scorpionfly
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