{ "19939": { "url": "/art/American-literature", "shareUrl": "https://www.britannica.com/art/American-literature", "title": "American literature", "documentGroup": "TOPIC PAGINATED LARGE" ,"gaExtraDimensions": {"3":"false"} } }
American literature
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African American literature

Black writers of this period found alternatives to the Richard Wright tradition of angry social protest. James Baldwin and Ralph Ellison, both protégés of Wright, wrote polemical essays calling for a literature that reflected the full complexity of black life in the United States. In his first and best novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain (1953), Baldwin portrayed the Harlem world and the black church through his own adolescent religious experiences. Drawing on rural folktale, absurdist humour, and a picaresque realism, Ralph Ellison wrote a deeply resonant comic novel that dealt with the full range of black experience—rural sharecropping, segregated education, northward migration, ghetto hustling, and the lure of such competing ideologies as nationalism and communism. Many considered his novel Invisible Man (1952) the best novel of the postwar years.

Later two African American women published some of the most important post-World War II American fiction. In The Bluest Eye (1970), Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), and Paradise (1998), Toni Morrison created a strikingly original fiction that sounded different notes from lyrical recollection to magic realism. Like Ellison, Morrison drew on diverse literary and folk influences and dealt with important phases of black history—i.e., slavery in Beloved and the Harlem Renaissance in Jazz. She was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993. Alice Walker, after writing several volumes of poetry and a novel dealing with the civil rights movement (Meridian [1976]), received the Pulitzer Prize for her black feminist novel The Color Purple (1982). African American men whose work gained attention during this period included Ishmael Reed, whose wild comic techniques resembled Ellison’s; James Alan McPherson, a subtle short-story writer in the mold of Ellison and Baldwin; Charles Johnson, whose novels, such as The Oxherding Tale (1982) and The Middle Passage (1990), showed a masterful historical imagination; Randall Kenan, a gay writer with a strong folk imagination whose style also descended from both Ellison and Baldwin; and Colson Whitehead, who used experimental techniques and folk traditions in The Intuitionist (1999) and John Henry Days (2001).

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