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Johan Gunnar Andersson
Swedish archaeologist and geologist
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Johan Gunnar Andersson

Swedish archaeologist and geologist

Johan Gunnar Andersson, (born July 3, 1874, Knista, Swed.—died Oct. 29, 1960, Stockholm), Swedish geologist and archaeologist whose work laid the foundation for the study of prehistoric China. In 1921, at a cave near Chou-k’ou-tien in the vicinity of Peking, on the basis of bits of quartz that he found in a limestone region, he predicted that a fossil man would be discovered. Six years later the first evidence of the fossil hominid Sinanthropus (Peking man) was found there.

He first went to China in 1914 as a technical adviser on oil and coal resources. He immediately became interested in fossil remains and eventually devoted himself to archaeological exploration. In 1921, at Yang-shao, Honan Province, he found elegant painted pottery that provided the first evidence of Neolithic culture in China. Within a year he discovered many other comparable sites across the vast stretch of the Yellow River Valley of northern China and published a preliminary account of his findings, An Early Chinese Culture (1923). His study helped to define what is now termed Yang-shao culture, which he related to the cultures of southwest Asia and dated at about 3000–1500 bc. Of his bronze findings, none could be dated earlier than about 1300 bc, during the period of the Shang dynasty. He described his progress as an archaeologist in Children of the Yellow Earth: Studies in Prehistoric China (1934).

This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.
Johan Gunnar Andersson
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