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Scotland
constituent unit, United Kingdom
Media

Cultural institutions

All of the arts receive support from Creative Scotland (formed when the Scottish Arts Council joined Scottish Screen in 2010). All aspects of traditional culture are researched, archived, and taught in the Department of Celtic and Scottish Studies of the University of Edinburgh.

Edinburgh and Glasgow are the cultural capitals of Scotland. Among the cultural institutions achieving high international standing are the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, the Scottish Opera, and the Scottish Ballet, all based in Glasgow. Other major institutions in Glasgow include the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, the Burrell Collection, and the Riverside Museum, The National Museums of Scotland include the National Museum and the War Museum in Edinburgh, the Museum of Rural Life near Glasgow, the Museum of Flight near Haddington, and the Museum of Costume at Shambellie House near Dumfries. Edinburgh is also the headquarters of the National Library of Scotland, which receives copies of all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland, and the National Galleries of Scotland, comprising several museums, including the National Gallery of Scotland (with works by Allan Ramsay, Sir Henry Raeburn, and other Scottish painters), the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, and the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art. Founded in 1947, the annual Edinburgh International Festival, with its Fringe (entertainment on the periphery of the festival), has become one of the world’s largest cultural events.

Sports and recreation

Sports are an important part of life in Scotland. Association football (soccer) has a wide following and is dominated by the Rangers and Celtic clubs of Glasgow. Rugby football is played especially by private schools and by their former pupils, but in the towns of the Scottish Borders it draws players and spectators from a wider social range. Although Scottish athletes compete as members of the United Kingdom’s Olympic team, the country fields national teams for other sports (e.g., football and rugby). Shinty, a hockeylike game, is popular in the Highlands. Curling is another traditional sport, although temperatures are seldom low enough for it to be other than an indoor activity played on man-made ice. Golf, long associated with Scotland though its origins lie elsewhere, is accessible to most Scots through widespread public and private facilities, and the country hosts one of professional golf’s most prestigious tournaments, the annual Open Championship (also known outside of Great Britain as the British Open). The Old Course of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews in Fife is the most famous of many excellent seaside courses. Scotland’s landscape is ideally suited to those pursuing hill walking, rock climbing, sailing, and canoeing. Skiing facilities have been developed in the Cairngorms and other areas. Hunting and shooting are traditionally sports of the wealthy, but fishing is popular among all classes, and the country boasts some of the finest salmon fishing in the world. (For further discussion, see United Kingdom: Cultural life.)

Media and publishing

Edinburgh was once one of the centres of the United Kingdom’s publishing industry. However, in the early and mid-20th century, Scottish publishing declined drastically, especially in the years after World War II, with many publishers moving to London. Only in the 1970s did Scotland’s publishing industry begin to revitalize somewhat. Some newspapers are printed in Scotland, but others, which include aspects of Scottish news and sports, are delivered from south of the border. The Daily Record and The Scottish Sun have the largest circulation in Scotland. The Herald (Glasgow) and The Scotsman (Edinburgh) continue to serve the west and east coasts, respectively, and their Sunday equivalents, the Sunday Herald and Scotland on Sunday, are competitors. Other parts of Scotland are served by local papers such as the Dundee Courier and The Press and Journal. Scottish Field and Scots Magazine are two well-established monthly publications covering traditional, leisure, and historical interests.

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) produces Scottish news and other programming for radio and television, including some broadcasts in Gaelic. Radio Scotland has largely locally produced programs. There are three independent television companies, including Scottish Television (STV), and several independent radio stations. Somewhat controversially, the Westminster Parliament has retained legislative powers over broadcasting.

Matthew James Moulton Iseabail C. Macleod Alice Brown The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
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